No Process? No Business.

Influency Marketing on FaceookInfluency Marketing on LinkedInInfluency Marketing on Google+Influency Marketing on Twitter

They TRIED for $550: Nissan of Manhattan Stole $250 From Me

3 Flares Twitter 0 Google+ 1 Facebook 1 LinkedIn 1 Email -- 3 Flares ×

Nissan Logo

Answer Guy’s Customer Service Wall of Shame Inductee

Let’s see how good I really am at this Search Engine Optimization thing. We’ll use a real-life example of incredibly bad customer service at Nissan of Manhattan and maybe, just maybe show Nissan USA and Nissan of Manhattan why bad customer service is bad business. Nissan of Manhattan, I want your attention. Yesterday, I took my 2008 Nissan to Nissan of Manhattan to have the brakes looked at. Nissan of Manhattan isn’t where I purchased my Nissan, but they’re geographically convenient for me, and I had used Nissan of Manhattan once before when my car was struck by a truck while in Manhattan. Nissan of Manhattan was close-by then, too. My Nissan is still under warranty. I chose Nissan of Manhattan to service my brakes because of that, and only because of that. Past warranty, I’m happy to have my vehicle serviced by a third-party service provider at a much lower price. But before I brought my vehicle to Nissan of Manhattan I first checked with the Nissan dealer where I bought the vehicle and with Nissan of Manhattan themselves to make sure that my brakes were under warranty. I was told exactly and explicitly the same thing by both the other Nissan dealer and Nissan of Manhattan: with the exception of the brake pads, the car was under warranty and the service would be performed at no charge. I asked the same question again when dropping off the vehicle at Nissan of Manhattan, and received the same answer for a third time. I received that answer from Nissan of Manhattan Service Consultant Jackie Murphy. Ask her if you like; her email address is jackie.murphy@nissanofmanhattan.net. Several hours after I dropped off my car, Ms. Murphy called to tell me that the charge for servicing my brakes at Nissan of Manhattan would come to almost $900. Her explanation was that this was because the front rotors needed machining and the rear rotors were rusted beyond repair and needed replacement. Remember, I’d been specifically told that the only part that was not covered under warranty was the brake pads. I was not pleased, and told Ms. Murphy as much. Her response was that she had no way of knowing ahead of time that there were other parts in my brakes that might need service. I pointed out the whole “I asked you a very specific question and you gave me a very specific answer” thing several times, and Ms. Murphy transferred me to her supervisor, one Jennifer Barbieri, the Service and Parts Director at Nissan of Manhattan. You may reach Ms. Barbieri at jennifer.barbieri@acuraofmanhattan.com. Ms. Barbieri informed me that rotors are considered a wear item and therefore aren’t covered by warranty. We discussed that “brake pads” thing yet again, including the fact that Nissan of Manhattan’s Ms. Murphy had been just the latest person to tell me the same story. No luck. In fact, Ms. Barbieri then went on to point out that the rear rotors had been destroyed by rust and that this was a sign of my negligence. I then placed a call to Nissan of America’s Consumer hot-line. It was there that I encountered a Nissan employee who made a point about rust: rust is a sign of something being kept wet and not used for a long period of time. This is my car. I drive it almost every day. There’s no way 31-month-old brake rotors should rust under those conditions. Unless they are defective. Oh: and he also told me that brake rotors are absolutely covered under Nissan’s new vehicle warranty. And though he stopped short of using these words that means one thing: the employees at Nissan of Manhattan had lied to me. The issue here would be why Nissan of Manhattan would lie to me about this. And now we can talk about business change and customer service. As Nissan of Manhattan’s employees correctly pointed out, Nissan of Manhattan gets paid no matter what. Either the customer pays them, or in the case of warranty service Nissan America does. Remember: Nissan dealerships like Nissan of Manhattan aren’t owned by Nissan America; they merely license the Nissan name and sell Nissan products. And that’s fine, except it creates two problems:

  • First, As Nissan of Manhattan correctly pointed out, when a part fails under warranty they need to ship it to Nissan America or they risk not getting paid for performing the repair. Which also means that if there’s any question at all about whether they “should have” considered the part warranted dealers like Nissan of Manhattan have an incentive to refuse warranty service.
  • Second, pure and simple, there’s the issue of a customer, at your establishment seeking repairs and to have his vehicle returned, being the path of least resistance. “I’m sorry Mr. Yablon, but you can’t have your car back until you pay me even though you might be right that you shouldn’t need to pay for this warranty service. BECAUSE WE SAY SO.”

The situation this creates is that customers, seeking warranty and customer service for which they have already paid, become merely one point on a triangle of parties that see each of the other two as enemies.

Customer service can’t be delivered under those circumstances. And what Nissan of Manhattan did to me when I went looking for warranty service would be bad enough if it stopped there, but it got worse.

Nissan of Manhattan’s Ms. Barbieri revealed to me that Nissan America provides a monthly allowance to each of its dealers for parts that don’t need to be returned. Ms. Barbieri, “in the interest of customer service”, decided that this month she’d include my brake rotor repair in that bucket of goodwill. Meaning that she essentially said to me “now that I’ve lied to you about your right to warranty service after my employee had promised it to you I’m going to do you the great favor of using money that I can’t use for any other purpose on shutting you up”.

I feel all warm and fuzzy, don’t you?

It gets better. Nissan of Manhattan didn’t charge me for the brake rotors. But they charged me for the labor involved in repairing one set and replacing the other. Which means, again, Nissan of Manhattan denied me the warranty service I had already paid for and Nissan America has confirmed is in place.

Net result after a lot of unnecessary aggravation: I saved about $300 by fighting hard after two Nissan of Manhattan employees lied to me. But I had to fight, and shouldn’t have needed to do that. And I should have saved $550. I just ran out of time and energy.

I told a story about lying as a form of customer service once before. And like then I want to be clear that my point in telling this horror story courtesy of Nissan of Manhattan is way less about venting than about showing you an example of what customer service and business change is not supposed to be.

And also to teach Nissan of Manhattan, you, and anyone with questions about the value of Search Engine Optimization just how useful a tool it can be. Just search the Internet for “Nissan of Manhattan” or “Nissan of Manhattan Customer Service” in a few weeks. You’ll see; Nissan of Manhattan is going to remember me.

Happy Thanksgiving to you. And also to Nissan of Manhattan.

3 Flares Twitter 0 Google+ 1 Facebook 1 LinkedIn 1 Email -- 3 Flares ×

10 Comments

    • Thanks, Eddy. Hey, Let’s pile on Nissan of Manhattan for bad customer service in all things! Everybody . . . Nissan of Manhattan is bad at customer service because . . .”

    • Well, I agree, Mark!

      I’m intrigued about how your Hubspot comment ended up here rather than on my story about Hubspot, but I’m glad you found us!

  1. Well it’s because I’m trying to move from WordPress to Hubspot and it’s not going well. And I ended up on your site because of your Hubspot post, warning me not to do it…Then I see you bragging about your SEO capabilities and clicked to see the Google search for Nissan of Manhattan, and that was impressive. Not sure if that makes anymore sense. Btw, the main reason that their customer service sucks is BECAUSE THEY ARE IN MANHATTAN. If they were in say, Portland, Oregon, their customer service would be better. It also sucks because they are a car dealer. Bust mostly because they are in NYC…

    • Thanks for the clarification, Mark. Been to our city, have you? ;-)

      BTW: I understand your NYC comments, and in some ways I have to agree (seriously; I HAVE TO), but it isn’t a complete universal. I think the real problem starts at what you call point #2; it’s the business Nissan of Manhattan is in that makes their customer service so bad.

  2. I think ur point is ludacris. U obviously have no understanding of an automobile and it’s parts. In the end u made out. Attention all observers this website belongs to his brother!

  3. Ur way of thinking is ludacris! You obviously have no understanding of how a vehicle works and the mechanics. In the end you won! Observers should b aware that his brother is the founder of this website . You should spend more time reading up on the mechanics of a vehicle. I have been a mechanic for 20 years and your story holds no value. Try attending automotive classes ! I have had nothing but the best service at Nissan of Manhattan ‘! It’s always the unhappy customers thAt post .

    • Michael, I didn’t win, I just lost less by refusing to back down. And I don’t claim to know anything about cars; what I know about is business and how to read a contract and a warranty. And Nissan of Manhattan refused to honor mine without making me fight for what I had already purchased … and lied at several points on the way there. That’s not customer service. I stand by my statement; Nissan of Manhattan is not to be trusted.

  4. This story on Nissan of Manhattan’s Customer Service was the most popular customer service story here for almost two years. “Was” is the operative word. Take a look at the new customer service story champion: Virgin America Customer Service, The Oxymoron.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Tweets that mention Nissan of Manhattan Stole $250 From Me. They TRIED for $550 -- Topsy.com - [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Jeff Yablon, Jeff Yablon. Jeff Yablon said: How Not To Do Customer …
  2. Is Search Engine Optimization Evil, Or Good Business Change? - [...] allowed, but on the other they tell you what to do to get ahead in their rankings.Example: I told …
  3. Insulting Your Customers is NOT Customer Service - [...] things like:Being held off for two weeks and repeatedly lied to by A&E Factory Appliance ServiceBeing denied warranty and …
  4. OK, So DON'T Tell Us How: Google Punishes The SEO Bad Guy - [...] I mentioned earlier this week, there’s a no-goodnik who figured out that by providing the worst-possible customer service he …
  5. Do You Know What You Sell? It's Not JUST Customer Service - [...] the world can’t make up for that. Your expectations have been set and then destroyed. Unlike my terrible experience …
  6. SEO Gets Harder As SEO Tools Get Cheaper ... Or Even Free! - [...] almost everything happen almost intuitively. I knew, for example, exactly how to get Google to see this page about …
  7. No Attention Span? Too Long? Didn't Read It? Hello, TLDR.IT - [...] but what if TLDR.IT learned to be a better editor and got built into web sites or browsers?I ran …
  8. Search Engine Optimization (SEO) on Christmas Eve - [...] My current favorite example of correctly-executed SEO happens to be a piece of my own work. Look here and …
  9. Looking For a Business Change That Works? Try HONESTY - [...] And best of all, saves you money when lest-than-honest actions waste time. Remember the story of Nissan of Manhattan …
  10. What's Great Customer Service? What If Nobody Has An Answer? - [...] he asked what would have made me happy.Of course, you remember the example of Customer Service at Nissan of …
  11. New Way in For a New Entry on Customer Service Wall of Shame - [...] the whole secret to customer service is simple: just do what you promise.This isn’t like when Nissan of Manhattan …
  12. Nissan Cust Svc | Nissan Photos Blog - [...] nissan cust svc answerguy.com [...]
  13. Scanners, QR and Bar Codes, and Supermarket Customer Service - [...] to do so by their managers or are lazy, but either way lying to customers is never a good …
  14. Divorce, Howard Stern, and "I Just Want Out" Business Change - [...] One of my influences, believe it or not, is radio personality Howard Stern (he was on my mind when …
  15. Honda Financial Wastes Money, Lands on Wall of Shame - [...] that it will cost them much more. It worked when we decided to make an example out of Nissan …
  16. Business Change Through Interactive TV. Shazam! - [...] There’s an old saying: He Who Forgets The Past Is Doomed To Repeat It. In examining business change, we …
  17. Why You Can't Sell to Small Businesses (Long Tail Marketing) - [...] Really Caught Osama?” is a good technique in the long-tail wars, that telling the world about Bad Customer Service …
  18. Mobile Phones, Car Dealers, Three-Ways, The Wall of Shame - [...] This is where The Answer Guy’s Customer Service Wall of Shame got its roots, starting with this story about …
  19. Look at These Numbers (Search Engine Optimization Laid Bare) - [...] And that doesn’t even account for phrases that have “customer service” in them, but not as their lead (for …
  20. Customer Service, The Music Business, and Kool Aid - [...] a while, asking myself which of the examples of awful customer service was “the worst”. Nissan of Manhattan Customer …
  21. Zuma London: Bad Customer Service. The Lanesborough? Perfect - [...] show up in SEO results. And it will;  Zuma, welcome to the aftermath of bad customer service. Ask Nissan …
  22. Want a link killed? Pay me. How do you spell 'Extortion'? - [...] When I wrote each of those piece I was taking advantage of the place where my personal indignation intersected …
  23. Virgin America Customer Service (Oxymorons) - [...] then, because she had nothing left in her arsenal, she lied. In a last-ditch effort to justify the manner in …
  24. Influency through Customer Service; Fraud at Verizon Wireless - [...] examples of poor customer service on The Verizon Wireless Customer Service Wall of Shame, like Nissan of Manhattan stealing …
  25. What's Wrong With Being Negative? (The Answer Is a Surprise) - [...] enshrined some notable companies for the way they do business. Two my favorite honorees there are Nissan of Manhattan …
  26. Koeppel Nissan Fixes Customer Service. And That's Influency - […] a look at the Wall of Shame and the first entry you’ll see is this story about Nissan of …
  27. Magic Johnson, Donald Sterling, Anderson Cooper: One Person - […] years ago, I told a story about rotten customer service at Nissan of Manhattan. I’m a stickler for customer …
  28. Escaping Nissan Customer Service Hell - […] That customer loyalty was to Nissan the car manufacturer. It wasn’t to Lynne’s Nissan, and my customer loyalty wasn’t …

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Follow

Get new posts delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers: